The Imitation Game, Bitch Planet, and Elementary: Media Miscellany!

Lately I’ve had so many ideas for new blog posts that decision anxiety has stopped me committing to any of them!

“What do my readers crave? A review of The Imitation Game, the first movie I’ve been to see in a theater since Iron Man 3? Incoherent babbling about how much I love the current season of Elementary? A pros and cons list of whether I should get an undercut? Photo post of me posing with both issues of Bitch Planet?”

Back in the days of LiveJournal, I could have settled this with a quick poll. But Word Press, and indeed every blogging tool I’ve worked with, is inferior to what LiveJournal was before it turned into a wasteland inhabited only by Russian spambots. So, since I cannot quickly and conveniently determine your desires with the resources available to me, I’ll just have to dump everything on you at once and hope everyone gets what they need out of it.

Reviews with minor spoilers for The Imitation Game, Elementary, Bitch Planet, and my ultimate decision re: cutting my hair below the read more.

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Companion Piece: Women Celebrating the Humans, Aliens, and Tin Dogs of Doctor Who

Hey guys! Do you like Doctor Who? Intelligent, thoughtful essays about women’s contribution to science fiction and television? Or maybe just my writing? I mean, I assume you like my writing at least a little. I’m not being cocky, but you are reading this blog. I assume no one’s holding a gun to your head.

(If someone is holding a gun to your head, I’m so, so sorry. Be strong. I don’t post very often.)

For the very first time, in the very near future, you can pay money to read words that I have written! Specifically, words that I have written in co-operation with my dear friend Liz Barr (who also co-edited the book. We wrote “The Heroine of Her Own Story”, which examines Ace and the seventh Doctor’s relationship over the course of seasons 25 and 26 in the light of a YA narrative. There are also tons of other fascinating essays, as you can see by perusing the newly released Table of Contents.

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The book isn’t properly out yet, unless you’re going to Gallifrey Con in LA in February, where you can get preview copies. This is just a foretaste of things to come. It isn’t stopping me being excited, though, and it shouldn’t stop you either!

An Anxious Viewer Watches The Normal Heart

 

I’ve watched The Normal Heart three times over the last week.

Anxiety interferes with a lot of things that it doesn’t even make sense for it to interfere with. Like absorbing new media. Everyone knows that anxious people sometimes have trouble leaving the house, or being otherwise social; I’m not sure how many people who haven’t struggled with anxiety know that it can also make it scary to venture into unpredictable emotional territory by getting caught up in a movie or a book you haven’t read before. But that’s one of the biggest things I struggle with. If you’re the sort of person who connects deeply with character and story, watching a new movie is a lot like going to a stranger’s house for the first time. Will I like the people I’m going to spend time with? Are they going to say or do things that make my anxiety worse? Will I feel trapped there, obligated to stick it out to the end even though I’m having a really bad time of it emotionally?

With regards to The Normal Heart, I actually know a lot of people who’ve delayed seeing it or decided to give it a miss altogether, because all you have to do is watch the trailer to know that it’s going to be devastating. The Normal Heart is about the dawn of the AIDS epidemic, when no one knew anything about AIDS except that it was killing gay men in droves. The story follows writer and activist Ned Weeks as he tries to raise awareness about the disease in the face of indifference from the straight world and opposition to his confrontational methods from the gay community. 

I tend to feel intense sympathetic anxiety for characters who are trying to tell the world an important truth that no one wants to listen to. It borders on being triggering. But stories about the fight for justice, equality, representation, etc., are my favorites kind of stories, so I knew I couldn’t not watch it. Plus, it’s about queer history.

A well-known problem with queer media is that it tends to be depressing as hell. I know plenty of queer people who find movies like this too upsetting to watch, just like I know die-hard Benedict Cumberbatch fans who aren’t sure they’ll be able to bear seeing The Imitation Game (trailer link) because they know how Alan Turing’s story ends. I definitely had to gird my mental loins before I sat down to watch, but I’m so glad I did, because if nothing else, The Normal Heart proved just how little queer history I actually knew.

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